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Director's Column

PLSJC Director Alan Hall writes a weekly column discussing library and community news, history, and other interesting subjects.

Library without Books

By Alan Hall, Director, PLSJ
Publish Date - Friday, September 20, 2013

[library article 22 SEPT 2013]

 

By Alan Hall

 

 

The new “library without books” that opened in San Antonio has made the news recently.

 

It is called “Biblio Tech” and contains no paper printed books, only eBooks and various online databases and a variety of iPods and laptops to supplement the 48 public computers.

 

The news media grabbed onto the story, which has been in the “library news” for almost a year causing librarians around the nation to debate the virtues of such an operation.

 

Certainly the past decade has brought a revolution to the formats in which information and media can now be obtained, and libraries are adjusting collections in response to online sources.

 

Following all the promotion of this new Biblio Tech, I pulled information about the specifics of this new bookless library to see how it was formed, and how it works.

 

San Antonio is within Bexar County, but the San Antonio Public Library, with its new 50 million dollar Main Library and branches, operates only within the city corporation.

 

County officials established the Biblio Tech to provide all county residents with library services, yet little if any coordination with the San Antonio Public Library system seems to have taken place.

 

The county is also seeing a population increase, straining the traditional public library system to serve the population of 1.4 million people.

 

The 10,000 eBooks available through the Biblio Tech seems small to me, when compared to our own database of 150,000 eBooks that are available to library card holders of our library system.

 

And why open a 4,800 sq. ft facility just for online products, when it could be coordinated with the existing public library system where eBooks can be downloaded from home?

 

There are great advantages to eBooks.  They are never overdue like those pesky paper books, and the dog can’t chew the corners of an eBook.

 

The librarian will never lecture you for spilling coffee on a library eBook, and technology has progressed so that downloads are easier and work on most iPods and hand-held devices as opposed to just a couple of years ago.

 

Not all paper-produced books are available in eBook format, and there are now some eBooks that aren’t available in the traditional paper book.

 

Publishers provide eBooks under contract, and some titles “go away” from the collection after the 26th download and must be renewed contractually by the library.

 

Our own demand for eBooks is growing every month as technology improves and more people obtain eBook readers.

 

It is estimated that 23 percent of Americans now use hand-held devices to view eBooks, a number that is growing every year.

 

At the same time, public library usage nationwide is also growing in the aspect that more people are using libraries for a variety of things beyond the checkout of traditional books.

 

Public computer use, programming and class instruction, scanning and faxing services are just a few services being accessed by the public.

 

And of course, my line of promotion of public libraries remains that we have the only public service desk in our communities staffed with humans to assist the public.

 

At the same time, you will want to visit our new library web site at www.steubenvillelibrary.org to see all the services and information sources available.

 

Will the Texas Biblio Tech work?  I think it will be popular and meet the needs of residents of the San Antonio area, but I think it would have been even more useful if it were coordinated with the San Antonio Public Library system.

 [library article 22 SEPT 2013]

 

By Alan Hall

 

 

The new “library without books” that opened in San Antonio has made the news recently.

 

It is called “Biblio Tech” and contains no paper printed books, only eBooks and various online databases and a variety of iPods and laptops to supplement the 48 public computers.

 

The news media grabbed onto the story, which has been in the “library news” for almost a year causing librarians around the nation to debate the virtues of such an operation.

 

Certainly the past decade has brought a revolution to the formats in which information and media can now be obtained, and libraries are adjusting collections in response to online sources.

 

Following all the promotion of this new Biblio Tech, I pulled information about the specifics of this new bookless library to see how it was formed, and how it works.

 

San Antonio is within Bexar County, but the San Antonio Public Library, with its new 50 million dollar Main Library and branches, operates only within the city corporation.

 

County officials established the Biblio Tech to provide all county residents with library services, yet little if any coordination with the San Antonio Public Library system seems to have taken place.

 

The county is also seeing a population increase, straining the traditional public library system to serve the population of 1.4 million people.

 

The 10,000 eBooks available through the Biblio Tech seems small to me, when compared to our own database of 150,000 eBooks that are available to library card holders of our library system.

 

And why open a 4,800 sq. ft facility just for online products, when it could be coordinated with the existing public library system where eBooks can be downloaded from home?

 

There are great advantages to eBooks.  They are never overdue like those pesky paper books, and the dog can’t chew the corners of an eBook.

 

The librarian will never lecture you for spilling coffee on a library eBook, and technology has progressed so that downloads are easier and work on most iPods and hand-held devices as opposed to just a couple of years ago.

 

Not all paper-produced books are available in eBook format, and there are now some eBooks that aren’t available in the traditional paper book.

 

Publishers provide eBooks under contract, and some titles “go away” from the collection after the 26th download and must be renewed contractually by the library.

 

Our own demand for eBooks is growing every month as technology improves and more people obtain eBook readers.

 

It is estimated that 23 percent of Americans now use hand-held devices to view eBooks, a number that is growing every year.

 

At the same time, public library usage nationwide is also growing in the aspect that more people are using libraries for a variety of things beyond the checkout of traditional books.

 

Public computer use, programming and class instruction, scanning and faxing services are just a few services being accessed by the public.

 

And of course, my line of promotion of public libraries remains that we have the only public service desk in our communities staffed with humans to assist the public.

 

At the same time, you will want to visit our new library web site at www.steubenvillelibrary.org to see all the services and information sources available.

 

Will the Texas Biblio Tech work?  I think it will be popular and meet the needs of residents of the San Antonio area, but I think it would have been even more useful if it were coordinated with the San Antonio Public Library system.

 [library article 22 SEPT 2013]

 

By Alan Hall

 

 

The new “library without books” that opened in San Antonio has made the news recently.

 

It is called “Biblio Tech” and contains no paper printed books, only eBooks and various online databases and a variety of iPods and laptops to supplement the 48 public computers.

 

The news media grabbed onto the story, which has been in the “library news” for almost a year causing librarians around the nation to debate the virtues of such an operation.

 

Certainly the past decade has brought a revolution to the formats in which information and media can now be obtained, and libraries are adjusting collections in response to online sources.

 

Following all the promotion of this new Biblio Tech, I pulled information about the specifics of this new bookless library to see how it was formed, and how it works.

 

San Antonio is within Bexar County, but the San Antonio Public Library, with its new 50 million dollar Main Library and branches, operates only within the city corporation.

 

County officials established the Biblio Tech to provide all county residents with library services, yet little if any coordination with the San Antonio Public Library system seems to have taken place.

 

The county is also seeing a population increase, straining the traditional public library system to serve the population of 1.4 million people.

 

The 10,000 eBooks available through the Biblio Tech seems small to me, when compared to our own database of 150,000 eBooks that are available to library card holders of our library system.

 

And why open a 4,800 sq. ft facility just for online products, when it could be coordinated with the existing public library system where eBooks can be downloaded from home?

 

There are great advantages to eBooks.  They are never overdue like those pesky paper books, and the dog can’t chew the corners of an eBook.

 

The librarian will never lecture you for spilling coffee on a library eBook, and technology has progressed so that downloads are easier and work on most iPods and hand-held devices as opposed to just a couple of years ago.

 

Not all paper-produced books are available in eBook format, and there are now some eBooks that aren’t available in the traditional paper book.

 

Publishers provide eBooks under contract, and some titles “go away” from the collection after the 26th download and must be renewed contractually by the library.

 

Our own demand for eBooks is growing every month as technology improves and more people obtain eBook readers.

 

It is estimated that 23 percent of Americans now use hand-held devices to view eBooks, a number that is growing every year.

 

At the same time, public library usage nationwide is also growing in the aspect that more people are using libraries for a variety of things beyond the checkout of traditional books.

 

Public computer use, programming and class instruction, scanning and faxing services are just a few services being accessed by the public.

 

And of course, my line of promotion of public libraries remains that we have the only public service desk in our communities staffed with humans to assist the public.

 

At the same time, you will want to visit our new library web site at www.steubenvillelibrary.org to see all the services and information sources available.

 

Will the Texas Biblio Tech work?  I think it will be popular and meet the needs of residents of the San Antonio area, but I think it would have been even more useful if it were coordinated with the San Antonio Public Library system.

 [library article 22 SEPT 2013]

 

By Alan Hall

 

 

The new “library without books” that opened in San Antonio has made the news recently.

 

It is called “Biblio Tech” and contains no paper printed books, only eBooks and various online databases and a variety of iPods and laptops to supplement the 48 public computers.

 

The news media grabbed onto the story, which has been in the “library news” for almost a year causing librarians around the nation to debate the virtues of such an operation.

 

Certainly the past decade has brought a revolution to the formats in which information and media can now be obtained, and libraries are adjusting collections in response to online sources.

 

Following all the promotion of this new Biblio Tech, I pulled information about the specifics of this new bookless library to see how it was formed, and how it works.

 

San Antonio is within Bexar County, but the San Antonio Public Library, with its new 50 million dollar Main Library and branches, operates only within the city corporation.

 

County officials established the Biblio Tech to provide all county residents with library services, yet little if any coordination with the San Antonio Public Library system seems to have taken place.

 

The county is also seeing a population increase, straining the traditional public library system to serve the population of 1.4 million people.

 

The 10,000 eBooks available through the Biblio Tech seems small to me, when compared to our own database of 150,000 eBooks that are available to library card holders of our library system.

 

And why open a 4,800 sq. ft facility just for online products, when it could be coordinated with the existing public library system where eBooks can be downloaded from home?

 

There are great advantages to eBooks.  They are never overdue like those pesky paper books, and the dog can’t chew the corners of an eBook.

 

The librarian will never lecture you for spilling coffee on a library eBook, and technology has progressed so that downloads are easier and work on most iPods and hand-held devices as opposed to just a couple of years ago.

 

Not all paper-produced books are available in eBook format, and there are now some eBooks that aren’t available in the traditional paper book.

 

Publishers provide eBooks under contract, and some titles “go away” from the collection after the 26th download and must be renewed contractually by the library.

 

Our own demand for eBooks is growing every month as technology improves and more people obtain eBook readers.

 

It is estimated that 23 percent of Americans now use hand-held devices to view eBooks, a number that is growing every year.

 

At the same time, public library usage nationwide is also growing in the aspect that more people are using libraries for a variety of things beyond the checkout of traditional books.

 

Public computer use, programming and class instruction, scanning and faxing services are just a few services being accessed by the public.

 

And of course, my line of promotion of public libraries remains that we have the only public service desk in our communities staffed with humans to assist the public.

 

At the same time, you will want to visit our new library web site at www.steubenvillelibrary.org to see all the services and information sources available.

 

Will the Texas Biblio Tech work?  I think it will be popular and meet the needs of residents of the San Antonio area, but I think it would have been even more useful if it were coordinated with the San Antonio Public Library system.

 [library article 22 SEPT 2013]

 

By Alan Hall

 

 

The new “library without books” that opened in San Antonio has made the news recently.

 

It is called “Biblio Tech” and contains no paper printed books, only eBooks and various online databases and a variety of iPods and laptops to supplement the 48 public computers.

 

The news media grabbed onto the story, which has been in the “library news” for almost a year causing librarians around the nation to debate the virtues of such an operation.

 

Certainly the past decade has brought a revolution to the formats in which information and media can now be obtained, and libraries are adjusting collections in response to online sources.

 

Following all the promotion of this new Biblio Tech, I pulled information about the specifics of this new bookless library to see how it was formed, and how it works.

 

San Antonio is within Bexar County, but the San Antonio Public Library, with its new 50 million dollar Main Library and branches, operates only within the city corporation.

 

County officials established the Biblio Tech to provide all county residents with library services, yet little if any coordination with the San Antonio Public Library system seems to have taken place.

 

The county is also seeing a population increase, straining the traditional public library system to serve the population of 1.4 million people.

 

The 10,000 eBooks available through the Biblio Tech seems small to me, when compared to our own database of 150,000 eBooks that are available to library card holders of our library system.

 

And why open a 4,800 sq. ft facility just for online products, when it could be coordinated with the existing public library system where eBooks can be downloaded from home?

 

There are great advantages to eBooks.  They are never overdue like those pesky paper books, and the dog can’t chew the corners of an eBook.

 

The librarian will never lecture you for spilling coffee on a library eBook, and technology has progressed so that downloads are easier and work on most iPods and hand-held devices as opposed to just a couple of years ago.

 

Not all paper-produced books are available in eBook format, and there are now some eBooks that aren’t available in the traditional paper book.

 

Publishers provide eBooks under contract, and some titles “go away” from the collection after the 26th download and must be renewed contractually by the library.

 

Our own demand for eBooks is growing every month as technology improves and more people obtain eBook readers.

 

It is estimated that 23 percent of Americans now use hand-held devices to view eBooks, a number that is growing every year.

 

At the same time, public library usage nationwide is also growing in the aspect that more people are using libraries for a variety of things beyond the checkout of traditional books.

 

Public computer use, programming and class instruction, scanning and faxing services are just a few services being accessed by the public.

 

And of course, my line of promotion of public libraries remains that we have the only public service desk in our communities staffed with humans to assist the public.

 

At the same time, you will want to visit our new library web site at www.steubenvillelibrary.org to see all the services and information sources available.

 

Will the Texas Biblio Tech work?  I think it will be popular and meet the needs of residents of the San Antonio area, but I think it would have been even more useful if it were coordinated with the San Antonio Public Library system.

 [library article 22 SEPT 2013]

 

By Alan Hall

 

 

The new “library without books” that opened in San Antonio has made the news recently.

 

It is called “Biblio Tech” and contains no paper printed books, only eBooks and various online databases and a variety of iPods and laptops to supplement the 48 public computers.

 

The news media grabbed onto the story, which has been in the “library news” for almost a year causing librarians around the nation to debate the virtues of such an operation.

 

Certainly the past decade has brought a revolution to the formats in which information and media can now be obtained, and libraries are adjusting collections in response to online sources.

 

Following all the promotion of this new Biblio Tech, I pulled information about the specifics of this new bookless library to see how it was formed, and how it works.

 

San Antonio is within Bexar County, but the San Antonio Public Library, with its new 50 million dollar Main Library and branches, operates only within the city corporation.

 

County officials established the Biblio Tech to provide all county residents with library services, yet little if any coordination with the San Antonio Public Library system seems to have taken place.

 

The county is also seeing a population increase, straining the traditional public library system to serve the population of 1.4 million people.

 

The 10,000 eBooks available through the Biblio Tech seems small to me, when compared to our own database of 150,000 eBooks that are available to library card holders of our library system.

 

And why open a 4,800 sq. ft facility just for online products, when it could be coordinated with the existing public library system where eBooks can be downloaded from home?

 

There are great advantages to eBooks.  They are never overdue like those pesky paper books, and the dog can’t chew the corners of an eBook.

 

The librarian will never lecture you for spilling coffee on a library eBook, and technology has progressed so that downloads are easier and work on most iPods and hand-held devices as opposed to just a couple of years ago.

 

Not all paper-produced books are available in eBook format, and there are now some eBooks that aren’t available in the traditional paper book.

 

Publishers provide eBooks under contract, and some titles “go away” from the collection after the 26th download and must be renewed contractually by the library.

 

Our own demand for eBooks is growing every month as technology improves and more people obtain eBook readers.

 

It is estimated that 23 percent of Americans now use hand-held devices to view eBooks, a number that is growing every year.

 

At the same time, public library usage nationwide is also growing in the aspect that more people are using libraries for a variety of things beyond the checkout of traditional books.

 

Public computer use, programming and class instruction, scanning and faxing services are just a few services being accessed by the public.

 

And of course, my line of promotion of public libraries remains that we have the only public service desk in our communities staffed with humans to assist the public.

 

At the same time, you will want to visit our new library web site at www.steubenvillelibrary.org to see all the services and information sources available.

 

Will the Texas Biblio Tech work?  I think it will be popular and meet the needs of residents of the San Antonio area, but I think it would have been even more useful if it were coordinated with the San Antonio Public Library system.

 [library article 22 SEPT 2013]

 

By Alan Hall

 

 

The new “library without books” that opened in San Antonio has made the news recently.

 

It is called “Biblio Tech” and contains no paper printed books, only eBooks and various online databases and a variety of iPods and laptops to supplement the 48 public computers.

 

The news media grabbed onto the story, which has been in the “library news” for almost a year causing librarians around the nation to debate the virtues of such an operation.

 

Certainly the past decade has brought a revolution to the formats in which information and media can now be obtained, and libraries are adjusting collections in response to online sources.

 

Following all the promotion of this new Biblio Tech, I pulled information about the specifics of this new bookless library to see how it was formed, and how it works.

 

San Antonio is within Bexar County, but the San Antonio Public Library, with its new 50 million dollar Main Library and branches, operates only within the city corporation.

 

County officials established the Biblio Tech to provide all county residents with library services, yet little if any coordination with the San Antonio Public Library system seems to have taken place.

 

The county is also seeing a population increase, straining the traditional public library system to serve the population of 1.4 million people.

 

The 10,000 eBooks available through the Biblio Tech seems small to me, when compared to our own database of 150,000 eBooks that are available to library card holders of our library system.

 

And why open a 4,800 sq. ft facility just for online products, when it could be coordinated with the existing public library system where eBooks can be downloaded from home?

 

There are great advantages to eBooks.  They are never overdue like those pesky paper books, and the dog can’t chew the corners of an eBook.

 

The librarian will never lecture you for spilling coffee on a library eBook, and technology has progressed so that downloads are easier and work on most iPods and hand-held devices as opposed to just a couple of years ago.

 

Not all paper-produced books are available in eBook format, and there are now some eBooks that aren’t available in the traditional paper book.

 

Publishers provide eBooks under contract, and some titles “go away” from the collection after the 26th download and must be renewed contractually by the library.

 

Our own demand for eBooks is growing every month as technology improves and more people obtain eBook readers.

 

It is estimated that 23 percent of Americans now use hand-held devices to view eBooks, a number that is growing every year.

 

At the same time, public library usage nationwide is also growing in the aspect that more people are using libraries for a variety of things beyond the checkout of traditional books.

 

Public computer use, programming and class instruction, scanning and faxing services are just a few services being accessed by the public.

 

And of course, my line of promotion of public libraries remains that we have the only public service desk in our communities staffed with humans to assist the public.

 

At the same time, you will want to visit our new library web site at www.steubenvillelibrary.org to see all the services and information sources available.

 

Will the Texas Biblio Tech work?  I think it will be popular and meet the needs of residents of the San Antonio area, but I think it would have been even more useful if it were coordinated with the San Antonio Public Library system.

 [library article 22 SEPT 2013]

 

By Alan Hall

 

 

The new “library without books” that opened in San Antonio has made the news recently.

 

It is called “Biblio Tech” and contains no paper printed books, only eBooks and various online databases and a variety of iPods and laptops to supplement the 48 public computers.

 

The news media grabbed onto the story, which has been in the “library news” for almost a year causing librarians around the nation to debate the virtues of such an operation.

 

Certainly the past decade has brought a revolution to the formats in which information and media can now be obtained, and libraries are adjusting collections in response to online sources.

 

Following all the promotion of this new Biblio Tech, I pulled information about the specifics of this new bookless library to see how it was formed, and how it works.

 

San Antonio is within Bexar County, but the San Antonio Public Library, with its new 50 million dollar Main Library and branches, operates only within the city corporation.

 

County officials established the Biblio Tech to provide all county residents with library services, yet little if any coordination with the San Antonio Public Library system seems to have taken place.

 

The county is also seeing a population increase, straining the traditional public library system to serve the population of 1.4 million people.

 

The 10,000 eBooks available through the Biblio Tech seems small to me, when compared to our own database of 150,000 eBooks that are available to library card holders of our library system.

 

And why open a 4,800 sq. ft facility just for online products, when it could be coordinated with the existing public library system where eBooks can be downloaded from home?

 

There are great advantages to eBooks.  They are never overdue like those pesky paper books, and the dog can’t chew the corners of an eBook.

 

The librarian will never lecture you for spilling coffee on a library eBook, and technology has progressed so that downloads are easier and work on most iPods and hand-held devices as opposed to just a couple of years ago.

 

Not all paper-produced books are available in eBook format, and there are now some eBooks that aren’t available in the traditional paper book.

 

Publishers provide eBooks under contract, and some titles “go away” from the collection after the 26th download and must be renewed contractually by the library.

 

Our own demand for eBooks is growing every month as technology improves and more people obtain eBook readers.

 

It is estimated that 23 percent of Americans now use hand-held devices to view eBooks, a number that is growing every year.

 

At the same time, public library usage nationwide is also growing in the aspect that more people are using libraries for a variety of things beyond the checkout of traditional books.

 

Public computer use, programming and class instruction, scanning and faxing services are just a few services being accessed by the public.

 

And of course, my line of promotion of public libraries remains that we have the only public service desk in our communities staffed with humans to assist the public.

 

At the same time, you will want to visit our new library web site at www.steubenvillelibrary.org to see all the services and information sources available.

 

Will the Texas Biblio Tech work?  I think it will be popular and meet the needs of residents of the San Antonio area, but I think it would have been even more useful if it were coordinated with the San Antonio Public Library system.

 [library article 22 SEPT 2013]

 

By Alan Hall

 

 

The new “library without books” that opened in San Antonio has made the news recently.

 

It is called “Biblio Tech” and contains no paper printed books, only eBooks and various online databases and a variety of iPods and laptops to supplement the 48 public computers.

 

The news media grabbed onto the story, which has been in the “library news” for almost a year causing librarians around the nation to debate the virtues of such an operation.

 

Certainly the past decade has brought a revolution to the formats in which information and media can now be obtained, and libraries are adjusting collections in response to online sources.

 

Following all the promotion of this new Biblio Tech, I pulled information about the specifics of this new bookless library to see how it was formed, and how it works.

 

San Antonio is within Bexar County, but the San Antonio Public Library, with its new 50 million dollar Main Library and branches, operates only within the city corporation.

 

County officials established the Biblio Tech to provide all county residents with library services, yet little if any coordination with the San Antonio Public Library system seems to have taken place.

 

The county is also seeing a population increase, straining the traditional public library system to serve the population of 1.4 million people.

 

The 10,000 eBooks available through the Biblio Tech seems small to me, when compared to our own database of 150,000 eBooks that are available to library card holders of our library system.

 

And why open a 4,800 sq. ft facility just for online products, when it could be coordinated with the existing public library system where eBooks can be downloaded from home?

 

There are great advantages to eBooks.  They are never overdue like those pesky paper books, and the dog can’t chew the corners of an eBook.

 

The librarian will never lecture you for spilling coffee on a library eBook, and technology has progressed so that downloads are easier and work on most iPods and hand-held devices as opposed to just a couple of years ago.

 

Not all paper-produced books are available in eBook format, and there are now some eBooks that aren’t available in the traditional paper book.

 

Publishers provide eBooks under contract, and some titles “go away” from the collection after the 26th download and must be renewed contractually by the library.

 

Our own demand for eBooks is growing every month as technology improves and more people obtain eBook readers.

 

It is estimated that 23 percent of Americans now use hand-held devices to view eBooks, a number that is growing every year.

 

At the same time, public library usage nationwide is also growing in the aspect that more people are using libraries for a variety of things beyond the checkout of traditional books.

 

Public computer use, programming and class instruction, scanning and faxing services are just a few services being accessed by the public.

 

And of course, my line of promotion of public libraries remains that we have the only public service desk in our communities staffed with humans to assist the public.

 

At the same time, you will want to visit our new library web site at www.steubenvillelibrary.org to see all the services and information sources available.

 

Will the Texas Biblio Tech work?  I think it will be popular and meet the needs of residents of the San Antonio area, but I think it would have been even more useful if it were coordinated with the San Antonio Public Library system.

 [library article 22 SEPT 2013]

 

By Alan Hall

 

 

The new “library without books” that opened in San Antonio has made the news recently.

 

It is called “Biblio Tech” and contains no paper printed books, only eBooks and various online databases and a variety of iPods and laptops to supplement the 48 public computers.

 

The news media grabbed onto the story, which has been in the “library news” for almost a year causing librarians around the nation to debate the virtues of such an operation.

 

Certainly the past decade has brought a revolution to the formats in which information and media can now be obtained, and libraries are adjusting collections in response to online sources.

 

Following all the promotion of this new Biblio Tech, I pulled information about the specifics of this new bookless library to see how it was formed, and how it works.

 

San Antonio is within Bexar County, but the San Antonio Public Library, with its new 50 million dollar Main Library and branches, operates only within the city corporation.

 

County officials established the Biblio Tech to provide all county residents with library services, yet little if any coordination with the San Antonio Public Library system seems to have taken place.

 

The county is also seeing a population increase, straining the traditional public library system to serve the population of 1.4 million people.

 

The 10,000 eBooks available through the Biblio Tech seems small to me, when compared to our own database of 150,000 eBooks that are available to library card holders of our library system.

 

And why open a 4,800 sq. ft facility just for online products, when it could be coordinated with the existing public library system where eBooks can be downloaded from home?

 

There are great advantages to eBooks.  They are never overdue like those pesky paper books, and the dog can’t chew the corners of an eBook.

 

The librarian will never lecture you for spilling coffee on a library eBook, and technology has progressed so that downloads are easier and work on most iPods and hand-held devices as opposed to just a couple of years ago.

 

Not all paper-produced books are available in eBook format, and there are now some eBooks that aren’t available in the traditional paper book.

 

Publishers provide eBooks under contract, and some titles “go away” from the collection after the 26th download and must be renewed contractually by the library.

 

Our own demand for eBooks is growing every month as technology improves and more people obtain eBook readers.

 

It is estimated that 23 percent of Americans now use hand-held devices to view eBooks, a number that is growing every year.

 

At the same time, public library usage nationwide is also growing in the aspect that more people are using libraries for a variety of things beyond the checkout of traditional books.

 

Public computer use, programming and class instruction, scanning and faxing services are just a few services being accessed by the public.

 

And of course, my line of promotion of public libraries remains that we have the only public service desk in our communities staffed with humans to assist the public.

 

At the same time, you will want to visit our new library web site at www.steubenvillelibrary.org to see all the services and information sources available.

 

Will the Texas Biblio Tech work?  I think it will be popular and meet the needs of residents of the San Antonio area, but I think it would have been even more useful if it were coordinated with the San Antonio Public Library system.

 [library article 22 SEPT 2013]

 

By Alan Hall

 

 

The new “library without books” that opened in San Antonio has made the news recently.

 

It is called “Biblio Tech” and contains no paper printed books, only eBooks and various online databases and a variety of iPods and laptops to supplement the 48 public computers.

 

The news media grabbed onto the story, which has been in the “library news” for almost a year causing librarians around the nation to debate the virtues of such an operation.

 

Certainly the past decade has brought a revolution to the formats in which information and media can now be obtained, and libraries are adjusting collections in response to online sources.

 

Following all the promotion of this new Biblio Tech, I pulled information about the specifics of this new bookless library to see how it was formed, and how it works.

 

San Antonio is within Bexar County, but the San Antonio Public Library, with its new 50 million dollar Main Library and branches, operates only within the city corporation.

 

County officials established the Biblio Tech to provide all county residents with library services, yet little if any coordination with the San Antonio Public Library system seems to have taken place.

 

The county is also seeing a population increase, straining the traditional public library system to serve the population of 1.4 million people.

 

The 10,000 eBooks available through the Biblio Tech seems small to me, when compared to our own database of 150,000 eBooks that are available to library card holders of our library system.

 

And why open a 4,800 sq. ft facility just for online products, when it could be coordinated with the existing public library system where eBooks can be downloaded from home?

 

There are great advantages to eBooks.  They are never overdue like those pesky paper books, and the dog can’t chew the corners of an eBook.

 

The librarian will never lecture you for spilling coffee on a library eBook, and technology has progressed so that downloads are easier and work on most iPods and hand-held devices as opposed to just a couple of years ago.

 

Not all paper-produced books are available in eBook format, and there are now some eBooks that aren’t available in the traditional paper book.

 

Publishers provide eBooks under contract, and some titles “go away” from the collection after the 26th download and must be renewed contractually by the library.

 

Our own demand for eBooks is growing every month as technology improves and more people obtain eBook readers.

 

It is estimated that 23 percent of Americans now use hand-held devices to view eBooks, a number that is growing every year.

 

At the same time, public library usage nationwide is also growing in the aspect that more people are using libraries for a variety of things beyond the checkout of traditional books.

 

Public computer use, programming and class instruction, scanning and faxing services are just a few services being accessed by the public.

 

And of course, my line of promotion of public libraries remains that we have the only public service desk in our communities staffed with humans to assist the public.

 

At the same time, you will want to visit our new library web site at www.steubenvillelibrary.org to see all the services and information sources available.

 

Will the Texas Biblio Tech work?  I think it will be popular and meet the needs of residents of the San Antonio area, but I think it would have been even more useful if it were coordinated with the San Antonio Public Library system.

 [library article 22 SEPT 2013]

 

By Alan Hall

 

 

The new “library without books” that opened in San Antonio has made the news recently.

 

It is called “Biblio Tech” and contains no paper printed books, only eBooks and various online databases and a variety of iPods and laptops to supplement the 48 public computers.

 

The news media grabbed onto the story, which has been in the “library news” for almost a year causing librarians around the nation to debate the virtues of such an operation.

 

Certainly the past decade has brought a revolution to the formats in which information and media can now be obtained, and libraries are adjusting collections in response to online sources.

 

Following all the promotion of this new Biblio Tech, I pulled information about the specifics of this new bookless library to see how it was formed, and how it works.

 

San Antonio is within Bexar County, but the San Antonio Public Library, with its new 50 million dollar Main Library and branches, operates only within the city corporation.

 

County officials established the Biblio Tech to provide all county residents with library services, yet little if any coordination with the San Antonio Public Library system seems to have taken place.

 

The county is also seeing a population increase, straining the traditional public library system to serve the population of 1.4 million people.

 

The 10,000 eBooks available through the Biblio Tech seems small to me, when compared to our own database of 150,000 eBooks that are available to library card holders of our library system.

 

And why open a 4,800 sq. ft facility just for online products, when it could be coordinated with the existing public library system where eBooks can be downloaded from home?

 

There are great advantages to eBooks.  They are never overdue like those pesky paper books, and the dog can’t chew the corners of an eBook.

 

The librarian will never lecture you for spilling coffee on a library eBook, and technology has progressed so that downloads are easier and work on most iPods and hand-held devices as opposed to just a couple of years ago.

 

Not all paper-produced books are available in eBook format, and there are now some eBooks that aren’t available in the traditional paper book.

 

Publishers provide eBooks under contract, and some titles “go away” from the collection after the 26th download and must be renewed contractually by the library.

 

Our own demand for eBooks is growing every month as technology improves and more people obtain eBook readers.

 

It is estimated that 23 percent of Americans now use hand-held devices to view eBooks, a number that is growing every year.

 

At the same time, public library usage nationwide is also growing in the aspect that more people are using libraries for a variety of things beyond the checkout of traditional books.

 

Public computer use, programming and class instruction, scanning and faxing services are just a few services being accessed by the public.

 

And of course, my line of promotion of public libraries remains that we have the only public service desk in our communities staffed with humans to assist the public.

 

At the same time, you will want to visit our new library web site at www.steubenvillelibrary.org to see all the services and information sources available.

 

Will the Texas Biblio Tech work?  I think it will be popular and meet the needs of residents of the San Antonio area, but I think it would have been even more useful if it were coordinated with the San Antonio Public Library system.